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PostPosted: Wed Mar 20, 2013 10:37 pm 
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Babylonian Star Maps and Texts

Here is yet more evidence of the ancient astronomy and astral religion, much of which found its way into the Bible, including in the myths of Yahweh, the patriarchs and the New Testament hero, Jesus.

MUL.APIN

Quote:
MUL.APIN is the conventional title given to a Babylonian compendium that deals with many diverse aspects of Babylonian astronomy and astrology.

It is in the tradition of earlier star catalogues, the so-called Three Stars Each lists, but represents an expanded version based on more accurate observation, likely compiled around 1000 BC.[1] The text lists the names of 66 stars and constellations and further gives a number of indications, such as rising, setting and culmination dates, that help to map out the basic structure of the Babylonian star map.

The text is preserved in a 7th century BC copy on a pair of tablets, named for their incipit, corresponding to the first constellation of the year, MULAPIN "The Plough", identified with Triangulum plus Gamma Andromedae.

Date

The earliest copy of the text so far discovered was made in 686 BC; however the majority of scholars now believe that the text was originally compiled around 1000 BC.[2] The latest copies of Mul-Apin are currently dated to around 300 BC.

Astrophysicist Bradley Schaefer claims that the observations reported in these tablets were made in the region of Assur at around the year 1370 BC.[3]

Parts

The text runs to two tablets and possibly a third auxiliary tablet, and is organised as follows:

Tablet 1

The first tablet is the most important resource for any potential reconstruction of the Babylonian star map as its various sections locate the constellations in relation to each other and to the calendar. Tablet 1 has six main sections:

All the major stars and constellations are listed and organised into three broad divisions according to celestial latitude allocating each star to three paths:
the northern path of Enlil containing 33 stars or constellations
the presumably equatorial path of Anu containing 23 stars or constellations, and
the southern path of Ea containing 15 stars or constellations,

Most of these stars and constellations are further attributed to a variety of Near Eastern deities.[4]

The heliacal rising dates of 34 stars and constellations are given according to the 360-day ‘ideal’ calendar year.
Lists of stars and constellations that rise and set at the same time.
The number of days between the risings of various stars and constellations.
The stars and constellations that rise and culminate at the same time.
The stars on the path of the moon, being the major constellations close to the ecliptic, which includes all the Babylonian forerunners to the zodiac constellations.

Even though the Babylonians used a luni-solar calendar, which added an occasional thirteenth month to the calendar, Mul-Apin, like most texts of Babylonian astrology, uses an ‘ideal’ year composed of 12 ‘ideal’ months each of which was composed of an ‘ideal’ 30 days. In this scheme the equinoxes were set on the 15th day of the first and seventh month, and the solstices on the 15th day of the fourth and tenth month.

Tablet 2

The second tablet is of greater interest to historians of science as it furnishes us with many of the methods and procedures used by Babylonian astrologers to predict the movements of the sun, moon and planets as well as the various methods used to regulate the calendar. The contents of tablet 2 can be summarised under ten headings as follows:

The names of the sun and the planets and the assertion that they all travel the same path as the moon.
Which stars are rising and which contain the full moon on the solstices and equinoxes in order to judge the disparity of the lunar and solar cycles.
Recommendations for observing the appearances of certain stars and the direction of the wind at the time of their first appearance.
Very approximate values for the number of days that each planet is visible and invisible during the course of its observational cycle.
The four stars associated with the four directional winds.
The dates when the sun is present in each of the three stellar paths.
Two types of intercalation scheme. One uses the rising dates of certain stars while the other uses position of the moon in relation to the stars and constellations.
The relative duration of day and night at the solstices and equinoxes, and the lengths of shadow cast by a gnomon at various times of the day at the solstices and equinoxes.
A basic mathematical scheme giving the rising and setting times of the moon in each month.
A selection of astrological omens.

There is some evidence that a third, and so far unrecovered, tablet was sometimes appended to the series. To judge from its opening line it started with a section of scholarly explanations of celestial omens.[5]

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PostPosted: Thu Mar 21, 2013 12:28 pm 
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Those interested in the subject of ancient astrotheology and the Bible may wish to read the book The Astronomy of the Bible by Christian royal astronomer Dr. E. Walter Maunder. Although it is an older work, many of his arguments remain sound and some have been validated by more modern research and discoveries. All in all, a fascinating and important work, despite his blatant bibliolatry and devout Christian beliefs.

Note this part (p. 161):

Quote:
The constellations...were designed long before the nation of Israel had its origin, indeed before Abraham left Ur of the Chaldees. The most probable date—2700 B.C.—would take us to a point a little before the Flood, if we accept the Hebrew chronology...

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PostPosted: Thu Mar 21, 2013 8:43 pm 
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The Zodiac and Judeo-Christian Astrotheology

It is interesting to note that in the Wikipedia article on the "Zodiac" there is at the top an image of the zodiac with the Greek god Helios in the middle, in mosaics on the floor of a Jewish synagogue at Beit Alpha, dating to the sixth century AD/CE.

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As we can see, Jewish astrotheology was alive and well during that era. There are several other such synagogue zodiacs from the early centuries of the common era, including at Hammath Tiberias, Sephoris, Beth ‘Alpha, Na‘aran, Susiya, Ussefiyeh and ‘En Gedi, dating to as early as the fourth century AD/CE.

We also know from the Bible that the Jews were well aware of astronomy, astrology and astral religion, as can be found in the Catholic Encyclopedia's article "Astronomy in the Bible."

Further down in the Wiki article, we find one of the several extant images of Jesus in the middle of the 12 disciples, surrounded by the 12 signs of the zodiac.

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As we can see, Christian artists themselves placed Jesus in the role of Helios in the middle of the zodiac, firmly associating Christianity with the ancient astral religion, which we are choosing to identify as "astrotheology."

Here's an earlier Christian zodiac with the same theme of Christ as "King Helios."

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Let us not forget that in the biblical book just before the gospel of Matthew, Malachi (4:2), the coming messiah is referred to as the "sun of righteousness, arising with healing in his wings."

The Hebrew word here for "sun" is שמש shemesh or shamash, the same name as the Babylonian sun god. (The Hebrew word derives not from the same Semitic root of Shamash, which is shamshu, but is the same as shamash itself.) Hence, Jesus is Shamash.

Furthermore, in the Greek/Septuagint of Malachi, the word for "sun" in "sun of righteousness" is ἥλιος helios, the name of the Greek sun god. Hence, Christian artists had no problem with putting Jesus in the place of Helios in the many Christian zodiacs.

The objection to the astrotheological roots of much religious ideation, including within Judaism and Christianity, is simply ignorant and irrational.

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PostPosted: Mon Mar 25, 2013 4:00 pm 
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Gnostic Astrotheology and Jesus-Iao the Sun

Those naughty Gnostics perceived Jesus as the sun! Well, they obviously belonged to a modern cult fallaciously obsessed with astrotheology, and we shall roundly ignore what they said in antiquity, while pretending to be experts on them. [/sarcasm]

Regarding the ancient divine epithet "Iao," in his magnum opus The Pentateuch and Book of Joshua Critically Examined (278) famed Bishop John William Colenso states:

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Concerning the Gnostics and Iao, Colenso (319) also translates a lengthy essay by F.C. Movers (Die Phönizier) that includes the following:

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What's that? Let me highlight that last part, by Bishop Colenso, who lived in the 19th century (horrors!).

Quote:
...these Gnostics, about whom I am speaking, frequently shadowed forth in their schools our Saviour by the emblem and symbol of the Sun, and took singular delight in this emblematical comparison...

In this discussion of the god-name Iao, it should be noted that this epithet was equated repeatedly in antiquity, such as by Varro and Diodorus, with the Jewish tribal god Yahweh.

Jesus as Iao

Movers continues:

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Read it closely - there are many juicy bits there that bear highlighting.

Iao is the Sun

Moreover, Macrobius clearly states that Iao is the sun. Discussing the mysteries and the oracle of Apollo at Claros, Macrobius (1.18.20) relates:

Quote:
Then ponder that Iao is the supreme god among all. In winter he is Hades, at the beginning of the spring he is Zeus. In summer he is Helios, while in autumn he is the graceful Iao.

φράζεο τὸν πάντων ὕπατον θεὸν ἔμμεν Ἰαὼ, χείματι μέν τ᾽ ἀΐδην, Δία δ᾽ εἴαρος ἀρχομένοιο, Ἠέλιον δὲ θέρευς, μετοπώρου δ᾽ ἁβρὸν Ἰαώ.

This passage has been rendered by Kaster thus:

Quote:
…say the greatest god of all is Iao: Hades in winter, Zeus at the start of spring, the sun in summer, delicate Iacchos [= Dionysos] in the fall.

So much for the modern "experts" who naysay the astrotheological origins of Christianity. Note that I have known this information for decades now, having studied these texts long ago. It is so old hat to me that I assume everyone else who is interested in the subject of Christian origins would know about it already. Again, ignorance of a subject assuredly does not make an "expert" of someone. Odd that I would need to point out that fact.

Quote:
"I am in agreement with a thesis put forward by Jodi Magness in a recent lecture on ancient synagogues in Palestine, to wit: the representation of the god Helios in synagogue mosaics is to be understood as a mythological trope for the sun. At the same time, however, there is plenty of evidence for an identification of the Sun - as in the sun deity, Helios - with Iao (= יהוה), the God of the Jews."

- The splendid Iao: the identification of Helios with Iao, the God of the Jews

Jesus Christ, Sun of Righteousness


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 26, 2013 12:39 pm 
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Solar Proverbs Throughout the Ages

Here's a handy concordance of proverbs from various cultures and writers over the ages:

Proverbs, Maxims and Phrases of All Ages: Classified Subjectively and Arranged Alphabetically (322-3)

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PostPosted: Tue Mar 26, 2013 4:00 pm 
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The Astral Theory of Biblical Interpretation

Here's an interesting article from 1907 that has some goodies in it. Notice that this sort of discussion was fairly mainstream among European scholars in the early 20th century:

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The fundamental theory of this new school is that the Old Testament books are based on the astro-mythological system of the Babylonians.... Traces of this "astral" thought, it is argued, are constantly discernible in the Old Testament...

From Current Literature, vol. 43, pp. 62-3:

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And don't forget this juicy quote from our beloved Robert M. Price:

Quote:
...I find it undeniable that...many, many of the epic heroes and ancient patriarchs and matriarchs of the Old Testament were personified stars, planets, and constellations...

IMHO, THIS knowledge represents the MEAT of the whole issue, since the real and profound meanings behind the myths are of paramount interest to me.

Knowing this information opens up an enormous world of wonder, which is why I find it so fascinating. Humanity at its best. The rest is comparatively shallow and uninteresting.

Here is a link to the first book mentioned in the article above:

Friedrich Delitzsch's Babel and Bible: Two Lectures on the Significance of Assyriological Research for Religion

Looks like there's quite a goodly amount of goodliness in this find. :D

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PostPosted: Mon Apr 29, 2013 10:53 pm 
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Here are a series of posts I've made on Facebook, emphasizing the astrotheological origins of much religious ideation. It is obvious that we need to repeat these facts. Feel free to copy and paste what you would like in order to respond to fallacious comments posted elsewhere.

A study of the Ugaritic texts reveals what we already knew: Much of the biblical religion is astral in nature. I have completed an in-depth study of Rev. Dr. James Gray's "The Legacy of Canaan: The Ras Shamra Texts and Their Relevance to the Old Testament," which includes much discussion of the astral or astrotheological nature of the Canaanite/Ugaritic and Israelite texts and religion/mythology.

"Astral Religion in Ugarit and Ancient Israel"
http://www.jstor.org/discover/10.1086/6 ... 2219337827

It's hard to believe, but there are far too many people who continue to deny these FACTS. Not only do they deny these facts, based on their ignorance of the source material, but they ridicule and derogate those who actually do know the information.

The days of the week are astrotheological, representing celestial bodies AND gods:

Sun-day
Moon-day
Tuesday (Day of Tiws = Mars)
Wednesday (Day of Woden = Mercury)
Thursday (Day of Thor = Jupiter)
Friday (Day of Freya, Vendredi = Venus)
Saturday (Day of Saturn)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Astrolatry

"Astrolatry is the worship of stars and other heavenly bodies as deities, or the association of deities with heavenly bodies. The most common instances of this are sun gods and moon gods in polytheistic systems worldwide. Also notable is the association of the planets with deities in Babylonian, and hence in Greco-Roman religion, viz. Mercury, Venus, Mars, Jupiter and Saturn."

If we are looking for the origins of much biblical ideation, we need look no further than the sun, moon, planets, stars and constellations:

"And they forsook all the commandments of the LORD their God, and made for themselves molten images of two calves; and they made an Ashe'rah, and WORSHIPPED ALL THE HOST OF HEAVEN, and served Ba'al." 2 Kings 17:16

Here's an excellent work by Rev. Dr. J. Glen Taylor: "Yahweh and the Sun: Biblical and Archaeological Evidence for Sun Worship in Ancient Israel."

http://books.google.com/books?id=NsoHhe ... un&f=false

Other terms for this astrotheological worship include "astral religion," "astromythology," "astrolatry" and "stellar theology."

Lak̇ot̄a Star Knowledge: Studies in Lak̇ot̄a Stellar Theology
http://books.google.com/books?id=ndKKGA ... CD0Q6AEwAQ

The worship of the ancient Sabaeans, an Arab tribe, was known in antiquity as being highly ASTRAL in nature. This astrotheological religion is called "Sabaism."

"A New Dictionary of Religions," edited by Dr. John R. Hinnells
http://www.blackwellreference.com/publi ... 20_ss1-156

"Star-Worship (Astrolatry, Sabaism)

"The sun, moon, planets and stars have been worshipped as gods in a number of cultures. Star-worship evolves from the awe felt at the beauty, regularity, mystery and power of the heavenly bodies (especially of the sun) and in response to their effect, real or imagined, on terrestrial and human life. The sun and moon, in particular, are perceived as the givers of time (time being measures by their motions) and the sun as the regulator of the cycle of the seasons. Star-worship usually accompanies, indeed triggers, the early development of astronomy and calendrics and sanctions the parallel growth of A strology. This was certainly so in Mesopotamia in the last two millennia bce [10: i–iii ] and in Central America among the Maya [9: v ]. Star-worship probably underlies the prehistoric megalithic astronomical sites of northern Europe [9: ii–iii ; e.g. Stonehenge] and similar sites in North America [9: iv ; e.g. the Big Horn medicine wheel]. From Mesopotamia star-worship passed into Graeco-Roman culture [6]. Sun-worship became, in the 3rd century ce , something of an official religion in the Roman empire, contemporary ideology seeing in the divine emperor (Emperor-worship ) a terrestrial counterpart of the sun as sovereign of the universe. At the same time Mithras was worshipped as a solar god (see Mithraism) and his mysteries incorporated much arcane astral lore."

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PostPosted: Tue May 07, 2013 9:00 am 
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Stunning Astronomical Alignment Found at Peru Pyramid

"An ancient astronomical alignment in southern Peru has been discovered by researchers between a pyramid, two stone lines and the setting sun during the winter solstice. During the solstice, hundreds of years ago, the three would have lined up to frame the pyramid in light.

The two stone lines, called geoglyphs, are located about 1.2 miles (2 kilometers) east-southeast from the pyramid. They run for about 1,640 feet (500 meters), and researchers say the lines were "positioned in such a way as to frame the pyramid as one descended down the valley from the highlands."

Using astronomical software and 3D modeling, the researchers determined that a remarkable event would have occurred during the time of the winter solstice. [See Images of the Pyramid and Solstice Alignment]

"When viewed in 3D models, these lines appear to converge at a point beyond the horizon and frame not only the site of Cerro del Gentil [where the pyramid is], but also the setting sun during the time of the winter solstice," the research team wrote in a poster presentation given recently at the Society for American Archaeology annual meeting in Honolulu...."

Please read the full article.

Peru Pyramid's Astronomical Alignment Revealed During Winter Solstice Sunset, Researchers Say

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PostPosted: Wed May 08, 2013 6:37 pm 
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Here is an interesting thesis - I thought that Robert Tulip in particular might want to look into it.

Of course, if we accept that Dionysus is significantly a sun god, that too would explain his "dancing with the stars."

Quote:
Dionysos: The Mysteries Made Visible
by George Latura Beke

Beke examines the mysteries of Dionysos. Dionysos is linked to a celestial phenomenon, but one so rarely seen that, in antiquity, it spawned the Mysteries and remains a mystery for most people today. In his BACCHAE, the Athenian playwright Euripides has Dionysos manifesting a visible light reaching from the earth to the sky, while in ANTIGONE, Sophocles claims that the god leads the dance of the stars, which indicates that Dionysos does have a connection to phenomena visible in the firmament. Even amateur astronomers know that the stars do not dance. They are stationary, fixed in their position relative to each other . The "stars" that do dance are the "Wanderers" of the planetary system, the seven visible bodies that course along the ecliptic and mark out the constellations of the zodiac. For Dionysos to lead the dance of the Wanderers, he too would have to travel along the ecliptic and soar along the zodiac.

The author has some other interesting papers - click on his name above.

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PostPosted: Wed May 08, 2013 6:40 pm 
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And here I thought that, since the ancients worshipped ancient astronauts, these alignments were based on aliens!

[/sarc]

:twisted:

Freethinkaluva22 wrote:
Quote:
Stunning Astronomical Alignment Found at Peru Pyramid

"An ancient astronomical alignment in southern Peru has been discovered by researchers between a pyramid, two stone lines and the setting sun during the winter solstice. During the solstice, hundreds of years ago, the three would have lined up to frame the pyramid in light.

The two stone lines, called geoglyphs, are located about 1.2 miles (2 kilometers) east-southeast from the pyramid. They run for about 1,640 feet (500 meters), and researchers say the lines were "positioned in such a way as to frame the pyramid as one descended down the valley from the highlands."

Using astronomical software and 3D modeling, the researchers determined that a remarkable event would have occurred during the time of the winter solstice. [See Images of the Pyramid and Solstice Alignment]

"When viewed in 3D models, these lines appear to converge at a point beyond the horizon and frame not only the site of Cerro del Gentil [where the pyramid is], but also the setting sun during the time of the winter solstice," the research team wrote in a poster presentation given recently at the Society for American Archaeology annual meeting in Honolulu...."

Please read the full article.

Peru Pyramid's Astronomical Alignment Revealed During Winter Solstice Sunset, Researchers Say

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PostPosted: Sun May 12, 2013 5:32 pm 
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Acharya wrote:
Here is an interesting thesis - I thought that Robert Tulip in particular might want to look into it. Of course, if we accept that Dionysus is significantly a sun god, that too would explain his "dancing with the stars."
Quote:

Hi Acharya, I am sitting on my favourite spot, so I hope some of the chthonic telluric vibes from the good earth will come through. :wink: Thank you for sharing George Latura Beke’s essay on Dionysus and the zodiac. I know George, and find this a fascinating topic, so have replied here at some length.

I discussed this topic of the zodiacal light with George a few years ago at a discussion board called calendersign, devoted to study of ancient calendars. George has pointed out that a visible faint line of light joins the planets along the ecliptic. Astronomically, this is due to the reflections cast by the sprinkling of space dust across the planetary disk of the sun. This zodiacal light forms a circular line in the sky at sixty degrees angle to the line of the Milky Way galaxy. These two lines, the zodiac and the galaxy, are great circles. ‘wheels within wheels’ in Ezekiel’s term, encompassing the visible heavens. Their crossing points are opposite each other, forming two Xs in the sky, one between Taurus and Gemini and the other between Scorpio and Sagittarius.

George’s analysis of the zodiacal light is debatable in the detail of the relation he suggests to Dionysus, as Acharya has pointed out. However, the zodiacal light is arguably central to understanding the Gnostic origins of Christianity among the Netser, the holy watchers, the Nazirites/Nazarenes who produced the cosmic myth of Jesus the Nazarene, later corrupted under the violence of Roman suppression into the Gospel encryption of Jesus of Nazareth.

So I am interested in how George’s observation of the zodiacal light relates to an astrotheological understanding of Jesus Christ. This story goes back to Plato, and of course much further back in time. In his dialogue The Timaeus, Plato appears to describe these two stable circular lines in the sky as the foundation of philosophy, as the basic concepts of identity (the galaxy) and difference (the zodiac).

A moment’s reflection will show why identity and difference are basic ideas, because they are used to compare things and find similarities and contrasts. This reference by Plato is not just important for philosophy though. The cosmic framework of the same and the different also stands at the origin of the Christian logos religion. The cosmic circles described by Plato in the Timaeus appear to be the logical origin of the Christian Chi Rho cross, the prominent church symbol of Jesus Christ flanked by the alpha and omega, first and last letters of the Greek alphabet.

Some traditional interpretations argued that Plato was not talking about the zodiac, but rather about the celestial equator. This reading bears the hallmarks of Christian distortion and suppression, and its typical deluded hostility to actual observation of the sky and discussion of the zodiac. For when we look at the sky on a dark clear night, the X is plainly visible as the intersection of the zodiac and the galaxy, cohering far more directly with Plato’s description than the abstract map line of the equator.

Plato’s old description of the same and the different helps us to see how this Chi Rho cross is a natural origin of Christian theology. The central theological idea of Christology is known as the ‘hypostatic union’, the imagined unity of the divine and human natures of Christ and Jesus in the one person Jesus Christ. Hypostasis is widely seen as an incurably metaphysical piece of magical fantasy. But when we consider the Biblical ideas against a stellar framework, the concept of the union of heaven and earth starts to make scientific sense.

This cosmic framework of zodiac and galaxy provides the origin of the idea of Jesus Christ as anointed saviour, bringing together the eternal heavenly Christ, symbol of anointing, with the imagined historical Jesus as earthly symbol of salvation. The idea, understood as natural stellar theology, is therefore that the galaxy anoints with its unchanging stability so the zodiac can save us through the temporal connection it forms between earth and heaven. Together, the cosmic circles mark the cosmic union of eternity (galaxy = constancy = identity = anointed Christ) and time (zodiac = change = difference = saving Jesus). The union of time and eternity is seen as the two opposite X points in the sky where the zodiac (change) crosses the galaxy (constancy).

This big hypostatic idea - as above so below - can then be explained as a simple parable of Jesus Christ. For example, the Christian hymn ‘There’s a Light Upon the Mountain’ includes the line “the suffering dying Jesus is the Christ upon the throne”. Understood as the union of history and eternity, this hymn line points to the hypostatic union of the zodiac and the galaxy as the opposite points in the sky that are imagined to connect us to ultimate reality. These points were venerated as long ago as the time of the Epic of Gilgamesh, with its discussion of the scorpion as the gate of heaven.

Here we see the origins of Christology in cosmology, the long regular ancient observation of the slow movement of the stars. The cosmology of the Chi Rho cross seen in the sky provides a celestial skeleton for ideas that were enfleshed with the historical parables of the Gospels. The entire concept of Jesus Christ is parable, and the Gospels served to try to make the cosmic allegory meaningful to the ignorant. Unfortunately, the parable of historicism, Jesus of Nazareth, was so wildly popular that the corrupt fools of orthodoxy were able to ally with the ignorant to thoroughly suppress the real cosmic origins of the myth in the story of watching the heavens. All we have now of the old high cosmic wisdom is fragmentary traces, the few hidden coded remains that survived the onslaught of barbarous Christian destruction.

On 28 October 312 AD, before the battle of the Milvian Bridge, Roman Emperor Constantine allegedly saw a cross in the night sky which supposedly inspired him to convert the Roman Empire to Christianity. At this time of year, the X in Sagittarius formed by the zodiac light and the galaxy was visible in the western sky at evening, and the X in Gemini crossed the sky through the night, standing high in the west before dawn. As George points out in his essay, today you have to go to a place far away from modern light pollution to see the zodiac light, and even to see the Milky Way, but for the ancients these lines in the sky were well known.

George’s research into Dionysus is interesting. He asks why Dionysus does not have a planet named after him. Dionysus was not one of the twelve Olympian Gods, but nor were Saturn or Uranus. Only six of the Olympians have planets named after them. Since reading Nietzsche’s characterisation of the Dionysian and Apollonian archetypes many years ago, I have thought of Dionysus as dissolving whirling dancing frenzy. It is interesting to explore how the archetype of the myth relates to cosmic observation, and how logically the observation – watching the sky – stands as the prior cause of the mythological narratives based on what we can see.

In the Antigone, Sophocles calls Dionysus ‘leader in the dance of the stars that circle in the night’. George suggests this is a reference to the zodiacal light. On face value, my impression would be to agree with Acharya to associate this idea of dance leader with the sun, which drags Mercury and Venus along in a beautiful waltz, while also forming the weekly phases of the moon. Hence Sophocles’ description of Dionysus bears comparison with the solar god Jesus Christ.

The stairway to heaven revealed by the zodiacal light is the next big idea. The dancing path of the planets along the ecliptic may relate to Jacob’s Ladder, with the angels seen as the planets moving up and down in their forward and retrograde motion. Genesis 28 tells us that Jacob took a stone, and put it under his head, and lay down to sleep. He dreamed of a stairway set up on the earth, and the top of it reached to heaven, with angels of God ascending and descending on it, and God standing above it. Jacob then vowed to use his dream stone as a pillar, anointing it with oil to form a worship shrine.

It is entirely plausible that Jacob’s ladder is allegory for the visible zodiac, with the planets as angels, and the ascent and descent their observed wandering motion among the fixed stars. The omission of any explanation of the dream is an example of how the ancient astral religion of the Jews was suppressed and censored by the politics of a degraded supernatural monotheism.

In associating Dionysus with the zodiacal light, George is opening up a path to comprehension of the stellar meaning of myth. But, considering Dionysus as a Christ type – especially in his role as a dying and rising fertility god – this stellar origin appears more close to a description of the sun than of the zodiacal light. Further, when the Lord of the Dance is understood as the sun, the path of the zodiacal light points us to the Christological union of eternity and time, in the Chi Rho cross formed by the galaxy and zodiac. Hypostasis here becomes a scientific concept, observable in the sky in the historically visible relation between change and stability. The use of hypostasis in conventional theology points towards this scientific understanding, but is degraded and corrupted by the politics of literal Christ historicism. The pervasive claims that Christian myths are literally true is a baleful delusion that has served to hinder progress towards rational knowledge.

Here, with the cosmic origin of the Christ Myth, we see the logical path from gnosis to belief. The gnostic watchers at the origin of priest-craft held a secret esoteric understanding of how the changing appearance of history relates to the unchanging reality of the cosmos, readily seen in the stars. Plato, following Parmenides, characterized this relation between appearance and reality in terms of belief and knowledge, illustrating how changing appearance does not provide the secure knowledge that is only available from unchanging reality. Gnosis, knowledge of the eternal truth, is seen in Plato’s allegory of the divided line in The Republic as absolutely central to the ancient idea of salvation, as the core of Plato’s ethical vision of the philosopher king.

The zodiac light does indeed provide the stairway from change to stability, because the planets move along the unchanging path of the sun but constantly change their positions in it, moving up and down like Jacob’s angels. So we could say the zodiac forms the “Jesus” temporal half of the “Jesus Christ” hypostatic union, with the galaxy forming the “Christ” eternal half. For those who have Acharya’s 2013 Astrotheology Calendar, I have presented diagrams of the two great wheels in the sky marked by the zodiac and galaxy. Acharya has kindly published these sky maps as the illustration for the month of October in her calendar, a month when under dark skies we can best see the zodiacal light.


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PostPosted: Sat May 18, 2013 5:19 pm 
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The Origins of the World's Mythologies

Here is a book, The Origins of the World's Mythologies by Michael Witzel published in January 2013 by Oxford University Press, that delves into the origins of the world's mythological ideas. While I don't find it as interesting as the information I bring forth and also have been putting into a monograph of a similar nature (i.e., the world's proto-religion), the book appears to be selling well and garnering attention, so it is worth looking into.

Notice that when one does a search for "sun," over 90 results come up, showing how popular has been that celestial orb.

A search for "moon" yields 68 results, while the word "sky" shows up 85 times.

Another popular mythological entity is Venus, which barely appears in this book, according to the search results. It also seems that "Jupiter" does not even appear at all in the book. Nor does "Saturn."

All in all, I'd have to say that there is room for improvement as to a history of the origins of the world's mythologies. My book continues to be needed, but it will take some time.

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PostPosted: Mon May 20, 2013 2:01 am 
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Witzel is one of the last few survivors passionately propping up the Aryan Invasion theory of India. So his books will be definitely selling well with generous help from the mainstream historians, christian missionary outfits and politically correct "experts"!

Is the tone of the book somewhat with a nose in the air "I know it all" type?





Acharya wrote:
The Origins of the World's Mythologies

Here is a book, The Origins of the World's Mythologies by Michael Witzel published in January 2013 by Oxford University Press, that delves into the origins of the world's mythological ideas. While I don't find it as interesting as the information I bring forth and also have been putting into a monograph of a similar nature (i.e., the world's proto-religion), the book appears to be selling well and garnering attention, so it is worth looking into.

Notice that when one does a search for "sun," over 90 results come up, showing how popular has been that celestial orb.

A search for "moon" yields 68 results, while the word "sky" shows up 85 times.

Another popular mythological entity is Venus, which barely appears in this book, according to the search results. It also seems that "Jupiter" does not even appear at all in the book. Nor does "Saturn."

All in all, I'd have to say that there is room for improvement as to a history of the origins of the world's mythologies. My book continues to be needed, but it will take some time.

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Janani Janmabhoomishcha Swargadapi Gareeyasi - Being near to your mother in your motherland is better than being in paradise

Ekavarnam yatha dugdham binnavarnasu dhenushu | tataiva dharmavaichitryam tatvam ekam param smritam ||
Just as milk is of only one colour though obtained from cows of different colours so also the peculiarities of different religious thoughts lead to the same one ultimate truth - Mahabharatha


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 10, 2013 2:53 pm 
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Astrotheological New Testament Blueprint in Isaiah and Psalms

Here is a biblical verse at Hosea 6:1-3 in which several New Testament and astrotheological/nature worshipping themes can be seen:

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"Come, let us return to the LORD; for he has torn, that he may heal us; he has stricken, and he will bind us up. After two days he will revive us; on the third day he will raise us up, that we may live before him. Let us know, let us press on to know the LORD; his going forth is sure as the dawn; he will come to us as the showers, as the spring rains that water the earth."

This verse evidently was used in the creation of the New Testament, as a "blueprint" of the attributes of the coming messiah. The death and resurrection on the third day to immorality are noteworthy, obviously, as central to the supposed life of Christ.

Moreover, the Lord's going forth as the dawn is a solar motif, appropriate for both Yahweh and Jesus:

http://www.stellarhousepublishing.com/j ... hesun.html

The sun god is perceived traditionally as the source of life-giving and plant-growing rain, and s/he and the storm god are often syncretized.

In this same regard, the inclusion of a triduum or three-day period is likewise relevant, as it is often symbolic of the three-day period during the solstices when the sun appears to be "standing still" - as is the meaning of "solstice" - and "dead," to be resurrected at the end.

Here is another passage revealing the astrotheological or nature-worshipping ideas in the Bible:

Quote:
"You visit the earth and water it, You greatly enrich it; The river of God is full of water; You provide their grain, For so You have prepared it. You water its ridges abundantly, You settle its furrows; You make it soft with showers, You bless its growth. You crown the year with Your goodness, And Your paths drip with abundance. They drop on the pastures of the wilderness, And the little hills rejoice on every side. The pastures are clothed with flocks; The valleys also are covered with grain; They shout for joy, they also sing." Psalm 65:9-13 (NKJV)

Note also the theme of God producing abundance, similar to the ideas of quails and manna in the desert, as well as the promised land of milk and honey, along with the multiplying of fishes and loaves in the New Testament.

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PostPosted: Mon Jun 10, 2013 4:24 pm 
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Sorry, I didn't see your comment before, Balu. I didn't know that about the author and the AIT, and I don't know if the book has a "know-it-all" air about it, but such a mentality within academia as a whole is not surprising.

balu wrote:
Witzel is one of the last few survivors passionately propping up the Aryan Invasion theory of India. So his books will be definitely selling well with generous help from the mainstream historians, christian missionary outfits and politically correct "experts"!

Is the tone of the book somewhat with a nose in the air "I know it all" type?

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Why suffer from Egyptoparallelophobia, when you can read Christ in Egypt? Try it - you'll like it:

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