It is currently Thu Mar 23, 2017 12:24 pm

All times are UTC - 5 hours [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 121 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5 ... 9  Next
Author Message
PostPosted: Wed Nov 17, 2010 7:31 pm 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Sun Aug 06, 2006 4:09 pm
Posts: 2142
Here is a fascinating summary of astrotheological concepts found in the Vedic India, including in the Rig Veda, which is at least 3,000 years old. The Indian texts include the "Storm Myth" and the "Sun and Dawn Myth."

From Zénaïde Alexeïevna Ragozin's Vedic India as Embodied Principally in the Rig-Veda, p. 213-214:

Image
Image

There is more...

_________________
Why suffer from Egyptoparallelophobia, when you can read Christ in Egypt? Try it - you'll like it:

Image


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Nov 17, 2010 8:27 pm 
Offline
Thor
User avatar

Joined: Thu Nov 11, 2010 2:29 am
Posts: 22
I personally wonder if sun and star worship has some foundations other than the psychological projections of the human mind. Consider the Gaia hypothesis http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gaia_hypothesis in which our planet is viewed as a living organism. Also, consider the importance of energy in any meaningful understanding of physics and biology, and how it is all but absent in the simplistic mechanical theories of petulant atheists like Richard Dawkins.

I was watching a TV program on dark matter recently and was struck by the similarity of their images to brain synapses.
Image Image
These are two that I found quickly on google. One can see how someone could associate the universe with the mind of a god.

I'm not proposing that this is a valid conclusion. I've sometimes seen clouds form similar shapes to things on earth, and of course I don't assume there is any real connection. However, I have become increasingly aware of the importance of energy in our lives, and most of the energy in our lives originates in the sun and the earth. Two lovers? I think not, but perhaps two partners in the life force within us.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Nov 17, 2010 11:15 pm 
Offline
Moderator

Joined: Sun Oct 07, 2007 8:17 pm
Posts: 2301
Location: Everywhere
Quote:
However, I have become increasingly aware of the importance of energy in our lives, and most of the energy in our lives originates in the sun and the earth.


Yes. and ironically we've recently delved into some conversations that uncover just how closely some of the mythological Great Year motifs closely follow the actual light cycle of the earth and it's long term trending up and down over time:

viewtopic.php?f=21&t=2606

That's what we have to face here. Most of the energy in our lives originates in the sun and the earth as you say. And so just as some of these mythologies outline precession through their cosmological function, they in turn follow the natural light cycle of the earth in so doing. A cycle of increasing and descreasing solar energy as it is.

_________________
The Jesus Mythicist Creed:
The "Jesus Christ" of the New Testament is a fictional composite of characters, real and mythical. A composite of multiple "people" is no one.

ZG Part 1
Jesus: Hebrew Human or Mythical Messiah?


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Nov 26, 2010 12:58 am 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Sun Aug 06, 2006 4:09 pm
Posts: 2142
The Astrotheology of Iran

Here's a neat video that describes what appears to be a very ancient celebration in Iran: The Shab-e Yalda, which refers to the Longest Night of the Year, i.e., the beginning of the winter solstice.

This Iranian narrator specifically says that the celebration welcomes the birth of the sun, and he further states that it represents the triumph of light over dark - a Zoroastrian concept that originates many centuries BCE.

It is also contended elsewhere that Mithraists celebrate this new sun as Mithra, meaning that it is at this time when he is born.



Regardless of these facts coming from Iranian writers and scholars, Christian apologists and Western scholars have been denying of late that Mithra has anything to do with the winter solstice or "December 25th." Apparently they believe they know better than the Iranians do about their own myths and rituals.

_________________
Why suffer from Egyptoparallelophobia, when you can read Christ in Egypt? Try it - you'll like it:

Image


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Dec 24, 2010 12:38 am 
Offline
Hercules

Joined: Thu Dec 23, 2010 8:11 pm
Posts: 85
Location: Rancho Cucamonga, CA
In the bible from Exodus to the book called Acts there is the term "stiff-necked" people. I have wondered if that term was used because those people refused to bow their heads down to the Jewish god, or was it used to refer to those people who were often looking to the stars for signs, which resulted in them getting a stiff neck. Would anyone know the origin of the term?


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Jan 31, 2011 3:26 pm 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Sun Aug 06, 2006 4:09 pm
Posts: 2142
More Astrotheology of Ancient India

Here's a fabulous quote from R. van den Broek, in "The Sarapis Oracle in Macrobius," from Hommages à Maarten J. Vermaseren, vol. 1, p. 134:

Quote:
In the Mahabharata the god of the universe is described as being conterminous [having a common boundary] with the universe itself, III, Vana Parva, 188: "Fire is my mouth, the earth my feet, and the sun and the moon are my eyes; the heaven is the crown of my head, the firmament and the cardinal points are my ears; the waters are born of my seat. Space with the cardinal points are my body, and the air is my mind."

This short and succinct paragraph represents a number of elements found in ancient nature-worship and astrotheological myths. The last part about "space with the cardinal points" being the god's body sounds like the god in a cross shape or cruciform.

Image
Ancient Greek figure Ixion on a cross, perhaps "representing the eternally moving sun."

Image
Jesus with a cruciform halo

Image
Da Vinci's Vitruvian Man

_________________
Why suffer from Egyptoparallelophobia, when you can read Christ in Egypt? Try it - you'll like it:

Image


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Apr 06, 2011 8:12 pm 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Sun Aug 06, 2006 4:09 pm
Posts: 2142
Here's a neat quote by an early Church father, Lactantius (c. 240 – c. 320), about the astrotheology of the ancients:

Quote:
...they who occupied Egypt were the first of all who began to look up to and adore the heavenly bodies. And because they did not shelter themselves in houses on account of the quality of the atmosphere, and the heaven is not overspread with any clouds in that country, they observed the courses of the stars, and their obscurations [eclipses] while in their frequent adorations they more carefully and freely beheld them. Then afterwards, induced by certain prodigies, they invented monstrous figures of animals, that they might worship them; the authors of which we will presently disclose. But the others, who were scattered over the earth, admiring the elements of the world, began to worship the heaven, the sun, the earth, the sea...

_________________
Why suffer from Egyptoparallelophobia, when you can read Christ in Egypt? Try it - you'll like it:

Image


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed May 04, 2011 11:01 am 
Offline
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Sat Mar 28, 2009 8:41 pm
Posts: 844
Acharya wrote:
Here's a neat quote by an early Church father, Lactantius (c. 240 – c. 320), about the astrotheology of the ancients:

Quote:
...they who occupied Egypt were the first of all who began to look up to and adore the heavenly bodies. And because they did not shelter themselves in houses on account of the quality of the atmosphere, and the heaven is not overspread with any clouds in that country, they observed the courses of the stars, and their obscurations [eclipses] while in their frequent adorations they more carefully and freely beheld them. Then afterwards, induced by certain prodigies, they invented monstrous figures of animals, that they might worship them; the authors of which we will presently disclose. But the others, who were scattered over the earth, admiring the elements of the world, began to worship the heaven, the sun, the earth, the sea...


Myth and Symbol in Ancient Egypt by Robert Thomas Rundle Clark explores the cosmology of the forgotten wisdom of Egypt. Rundle Clark presents a fresh new analysis of how the Egyptians thought, helping to understand how the logical principles of the nature of the universe are embedded in Egyptian cosmogony.

In noting that Egypt had a very ancient civilization, that was basically lost, with its writing, Rundle Clark says the influence of Egypt on the ancient world is systematically underestimated. One key theme is the way the Egyptians viewed their Gods as forces of nature, not entities.

Only with the rise of the fallen Abrahamic faiths did the concept of God as supernatural entity become powerful. We are still living under the dominance of this delusion. However, understanding of Egypt can help to put theology back on a natural basis.

Most interesting to me is the astronomy, with an apparent match between modern scientific cosmology and main features of Egyptian myth. Myth and Symbol in Ancient Egypt analyses the relations of the Gods and their evolution. Ptah came to be viewed as the first principle of existence, explaining the origins of the primeval waters Nun, who had earlier been viewed as the beginning. Like a scarab beetle rolling its dung ball, Egyptian symbol of the dawn as the sun emerges each day from the chaos of night, the early infinite chaos of Nun enabled the emergence of form - Atum-Ra, and then of life - Shu, order - Tefnut, Sky - Nut, Earth - Geb, intelligence - Thoth, and direction - Osiris, Isis and Horus.

Looked at astronomically, Ptah equates to the origin of the cosmos in the Big Bang and its successive entirety. The primeval waters (Nun) equate to the early period of the solar system as a spinning blob surrounding the sun before the planets had coalesced. Only after a billion years did the solar system gain the stability that allowed earth to exist, with the emergence of sky (Nut) and earth (Geb) as framing terrestrial life. In the Egyptian cosmogony, sky and earth have their origin in the marriage of life (Shu) and order(Tefnut) , which arise from the emergence of form (Atum) from chaos (Nun). This matches to human perception, with the daily round of the sky having its origin in the structured patterns of life. Life in turn emerged in union with order from the original coalescence of the earth as a planet hospitable to life. This original formation of the earth occurred in a way closely analogous to how the Egyptians saw the emergence of Atum from Nun.

Rundle Clark notes that the celestial poles were key points for the ancient Egyptians. Over the thousands of years of Egyptian continuity, the position of the poles shifted perceptibly due to precession of the equinox. I believe this shift found its way into Christianity in the apocalypse theme of the dragon giving his seat to the Bear Lion - matching the move of the north celestial pole from the Dragon Draco, its position in ancient times, to the Bears Ursa Major and Minor, the constellations next to Leo the Lion.

A summary of the Egyptian cosmogony is as follows: "At first there was darkness and a primeval ocean called Nun. The Sun God Atum, Ra or Re, the Lord of Creation rose and spat out the elements of moisture (the Goddess Tefnut) and air (the God Shu). The twins, Shu and Tefnut gave birth to the Earth God, Geb, and the Sky Goddess, Nut. The God and Goddess Geb and Nut had four children: Osiris, Isis, Seth and Nephthys." from http://www.king-tut.org.uk/egyptian-gods/cosmogony.htm

Starting with the myths of the old kingdom, Rundle Clark explains that these myths supported a unity of religion and life, but the early ordered society gave way to the upheaval of conflict, invasion and loss of understanding. A subtext of the book is how the Orientalist tradition of Egyptology has failed to see the essential unity and coherence of the old Egyptian worldview and mindset. By inviting us to try to step back into the lost ancient mentality, Myth and Symbol in Ancient Egypt is an indispensable text for knowledge of the psychology and religion of a people who are forgotten forebears of Western civilization.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Nov 28, 2011 1:54 pm 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Sun Aug 06, 2006 4:09 pm
Posts: 2142
Star Worship of the Ancient Israelites

Here's an interesting entry in the Jewish Encyclopedia under "Star Worship" (11:257). Despite the fact that this important and fascinating information is not widely known - and even denied in some quarters - this older, mainstream publication from 1906 contains accurate data about the astrotheology of the ancients, also called "astrolatry," "astral religion" and "astromythology." Contrary to claims, astrotheological research does not go out of date for the most part and is not "outdated" simply because it is found in older texts. Indeed, most of the older scholarship is sound and has been verified by modern methodologies, tools and discoveries.

Note that there are several themes here over which I've been assailed these many years, despite the fact that these contentions are accurate and have been known, obviously, for over a century at least. (I was going to bold these themes, but the whole entry is full of them! I have added links to the various pertinent scriptures in this entry, for the reader's convenience.) I included many of these motifs in the first edition of my book The Christ Conspiracy, under the chapter "The Myth of Hebrew Monotheism," as well as elsewhere, of course. It really is too bad that religious bias, prejudice and ignorance have prevented most of humanity from knowing about this fascinating and important information that affects and unites us all globally.

The beauty of this fairly brief article is its thoroughness and pithiness, presenting the various proofs in a direct and forthright manner. Although its entry could be construed as an admission against interest, the Jewish Encyclopedia is not purposely omitting or denying this aspect of Hebrew worship. Of course, they cannot deny the ancient Hebrew, Israelite and Jewish astrolatry/astrotheology, because it is mentioned several times in the Bible itself. So thorough, in fact, is this entry that I will need to make sure I've included all the biblical references to astrotheology in my Christ Con revision. Note also that the verses in the biblical book of Ezekiel concerning the secret worship of the Jewish priesthood are being associated here, as it is in Christ Conspiracy, with the ancient Israelite astrolatry. This secret worship I consider to be part of the mysteries, which is one reason the astral myths lost their meaning among the masses.

Moreover, as concerns the Talmudic commentary on this ancient astrolatry/astrotheology, I included several such passages in my book Suns of God as well. In Suns of God, I also discuss the Jewish tribal god Yahweh as significantly solar, as well as the lunar nature of much Jewish worship.

Once we have discerned the astrotheological nature of much ancient religion, including and especially sun worship or solar religion, and we have noted the similar themes that revolve around celestial and other natural entities and forces, it becomes a matter of science, reason and logic to contend that various biblical figures possessing these same or similar attributes are likewise astrotheological in nature, including Jesus Christ as a Jewish remake of the ancient solar hero or sun god. Once this astrolatry/astrotheology is accepted as a genuinely ancient form of worship, that door of logical association and identification is blown wide open; this fact explains significantly why certain individuals are "hellbent" on denying this information and preventing it from being widespread.

(A grammar lesson for today: Do not leave the pronoun "this" or "these" alone and unqualified, as was done in the first paragraph below. Always refer back to whatever it is in the preceding sentence or paragraph that the "this" or "these" denotes. If you don't refer back, you will leave the meaning ambiguous, reduce the quotability of your sentence and miss an opportunity to show off your erudition by utilizing a nice juicy qualifier.)

Quote:
STAR-WORSHIP:
By: Executive Committee of the Editorial Board., M. Seligsohn

Among the Israelites.

This [astrolatry/astrotheology] is perhaps the oldest form of idolatry practised by the ancients. According to Wisdom xiii. 2, the observation of the stars in the East very early led the people to regard the planets and the fixed stars as gods. The religion of the ancient Egyptians is known to have consisted preeminently of sun-worship. Moses sternly warned the Israelites against worshiping the sun, moon, stars, and all the host of heaven (Deut. iv. 19, xvii. 3); it may be said that the prohibition of making and worshiping any image of that which is in heaven above (Ex. xx. 4; Deut. v. 8) implies also the stars and the other celestial bodies.

The Israelites fell into this kind of idolatry, and as early as the time of Amos they had the images of Siccuth and Chiun, "the stars of their god" (Amos v. 26, R. V.); the latter name is generally supposed to denote the planet Saturn. That the kingdom of Israel fell earlier than that of Judah is stated (II Kings xvii. 16) to have been due, among other causes, to its worshiping the host of heaven. But the kingdom of Judah in its later period seems to have out-done the Northern Kingdom in star-worship. Of Manasseh it is related that he built altars to all the host of heaven in the two courts of the house of Yhwh, and it seems that it was the practise of even kings before him to appoint priests who offered sacrifices to the sun, the moon, the planets, and all the host of heaven. Altars for star-worship were built on the roofs of the houses, and horses and chariots were dedicated to the worship of the sun (ib. xxi. 5; xxiii. 4-5, 11-12). Star-worship continued in Judah until the eighteenth year of Josiah's reign (621 B.C.), when the king took measures to abolish all kinds of idolatry (ib.). But although star-worship was then abolished as a public cult, it was practised privately by individuals, who worshiped the heavenly bodies, and poured out libations to them on the roofs of their houses (Zeph. i. 5; Jer. viii. 2, xix. 13). Jeremiah (vii. 18) describes the worship of the queen of heaven to have been more particularly common among the women. Ezekiel, who prophesied in the sixth year of the captivity of Jehoiachin (591 B.C.), describes the worship of the sun as practised in the court of the Temple (Ezek. viii. 16et seq.), and from Jer. xliv. 17 et seq. it may be seen that even after the destruction of the Temple the women insisted on continuing to worship the queen of heaven.

In Job (xxxi. 26 et seq.) there is an allusion to the kissing of the hand in the adoration of the moon (see Moon, Biblical Data). According to Robertson Smith ("The Religion of the Semites," p. 127, note 3, Edinburgh, 1889), star-worship is not of great antiquity among the Semites in general, nor among the Hebrews in particular, for the latter adopted this form of idolatry only under the influence of the Assyrians. But Fritz Hommel ("Der Gestirndienst der Alten Araber," Munich, 1901) expresses the opposite opinion. He points to the fact that the Hebrew root which denotes the verb "to swear" is the same as that which denotes "seven," and claims that this fact establishes a connection between swearing and the seven planets; and he furthermore declares that there are many Biblical evidences of star-worship among the ancient Hebrews. Thus, the fact that Terah, Abraham's father, had lived first at Ur of the Chaldees, and that later he settled at Haran (Gen. xi. 31), two cities known from Assyrian inscriptions as places of moon-worship, shows that Abraham's parents were addicted to that form of idolatry. According to legend, Abraham himself worshiped the sun, moon, and the stars before he recognized the true God in Yhwh (see Abraham in Apocryphal and Rabbinical Literature). The golden calf, Hommel declares, was nothing more than an emblem of the moon-god, which, in the Assyrian inscription, is styled "the youthful and mighty bull" and the lord of the heavenly hosts (comp. "Yhwh Ẓeba'ot," which term is intentionally omitted from the Pentateuch). He assigns the same character to the two calves made by Jeroboam several centuries later (I Kings xii. 28).

The ancient Hebrews, being nomads, like the Arabs favored the moon, while the Babylonians, who were an agricultural nation, preferred the sun. But, as appears from Ezek. xx. 7-8, the moon-worship of the Israelites, even while they were still in Egypt, was combined with sun-worship. The close similarity between the ancient Hebrews and the southern Arabs has led Hommel furthermore to find allusion to moon-worship in such Hebrew names as begin with "ab" (= "father"), as in "Abimelech" and "Absalom," or with "'am" (= "uncle"), as in "Amminadab" and "Jeroboam," because these particles, when they appear in the names of southern Arabs, refer to the moon.

The term "star-worship" ("'abodat kokabim u-mazzalot") in the Talmud and in post-Talmudic literature is chiefly a censor's emendation for "'abodah zarah." In connection with star-worship, it is related in the Mishnah ('Ab. Zarah iv. 7) that the Rabbis ("zeḳenim") were asked if God dislikes idolatry why He did not destroy the idols. The Rabbis answered: "If the heathen worshiped only idols perhaps God would have destroyed the objects of their adoration, but they worship also the sun, the moon, the stars, and all the host of heaven, and God can not destroy the world on account of the heathen."

Here's an image of Jews worshipping the Semitic god Molech, who was largely solar and stellar:

Image

The natural end result of Israelite astrolatry:

Image

Star Worship of the Ancient Israelites

Star Worship of the Ancient Israelites

Star Worship of the Ancient Israelites

_________________
Why suffer from Egyptoparallelophobia, when you can read Christ in Egypt? Try it - you'll like it:

Image


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Nov 29, 2011 2:28 am 
Offline
Apollo
User avatar

Joined: Fri Aug 11, 2006 2:02 am
Posts: 353
Location: Bharathavarsham
Mr. Molech has a striking resemblance to Varaha, the boar avatar of Vishnu

Quote:
Acharya"]Star Worship of the Ancient Israelites

Here's an image of Jews worshipping the Semitic god Molech, who was largely solar and stellar:

Image

_________________
Janani Janmabhoomishcha Swargadapi Gareeyasi - Being near to your mother in your motherland is better than being in paradise

Ekavarnam yatha dugdham binnavarnasu dhenushu | tataiva dharmavaichitryam tatvam ekam param smritam ||
Just as milk is of only one colour though obtained from cows of different colours so also the peculiarities of different religious thoughts lead to the same one ultimate truth - Mahabharatha


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Nov 29, 2011 12:30 pm 
Tat Tvam Asi wrote:
Quote:
Native, I moved this from the astrotheology of the ancients thread to here. Big question, what does this post have to do with the post that you are responding to about Israelite star worship? You're on about the Egyptians and Greeks and the Milky Way creation myths, but I don't see you connecting it to the Israelites.

I just assumed that it was obviously that the Milky Way mythology also should be mentioned in order to give the whole mytho-cosmological worshipping picture.

1) The northern hemisphere Milky Way represents Yahweh.
2) The southern hemisphere Milky Way represents Ashera.

From http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asherah#Di ... cholarship
Quote:
A number of scholars, however, including archeologist William G. Dever[14] and Judith Hadley,[15] continue to interpret the inscription in a way that it refers to Asherah as an Israelite goddess and consort of Yahweh. Dever's book Did God Have a Wife? adduces archaeological evidence—for instance, many female figurines unearthed in ancient Israel—as supporting the view that in Israelite folk religion of the monarchal period Asherah functioned as a goddess and consort of Yahweh and was worshiped as the Queen of Heaven, for whose festival the Hebrews baked small cakes.

Read also this: http://news.discovery.com/history/god-w ... 10318.html


Top
  
 
PostPosted: Tue Nov 29, 2011 2:00 pm 
Offline
Moderator

Joined: Sun Oct 07, 2007 8:17 pm
Posts: 2301
Location: Everywhere
The problem is that there was no northern and southern hemisphere in the Israelite's world view. Yahweh and Asherah are the Cannanite polytheistic roots where the former consort of El Elyon, the most high, was later attached to Yahweh after the priesthood of Yahweh had done away with El Elyon and combined his former attributes with Yahweh.

The End of Monotheism


But there's no reason to go any further than that here as we don't need the entire forum over run with Milky Way myth appeals. That becomes disruptive trolling especially the more aggressive it becomes. So just try to mellow out a little bit. I already had to move it once. There's no reason to try and keep posting on this thread about the Milky Way any more. Just keep it in the Milky Way Myths thread and make the case over there if you want to pursue it further...

_________________
The Jesus Mythicist Creed:
The "Jesus Christ" of the New Testament is a fictional composite of characters, real and mythical. A composite of multiple "people" is no one.

ZG Part 1
Jesus: Hebrew Human or Mythical Messiah?


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Nov 30, 2011 7:30 am 
Offline
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Sat Mar 28, 2009 8:41 pm
Posts: 844
Acharya wrote:
Star Worship of the Ancient Israelites

Here's an interesting entry in the Jewish Encyclopedia under "Star Worship" (11:257). Despite the fact that this important and fascinating information is not widely known - and even denied in some quarters - this older, mainstream publication from 1906 contains accurate data about the astrotheology of the ancients, also called "astrolatry," "astral religion" and "astromythology." Contrary to claims, astrotheological research does not go out of date for the most part and is not "outdated" simply because it is found in older texts. Indeed, most of the older scholarship is sound and has been verified by modern methodologies, tools and discoveries.
Black Athena may well be the best source for why older texts are more reliable. The academic study of Classics was infested by anti-Semitism and the racist idea that nothing Greek could come from Africa, as the universities were corrupted to legitimize the European conquest of the world. So everyone who respected Egypt was shunted into the outer darkness to wail and gnash their teeth.

You know the line at John 1:46 "Can anything good come out of Nazareth?” The question in universities dominated by the racist dogma of Classics has been "“Can anything good come out of Egypt?" and their prejudiced answer, based on worship of Greece, has been "No". There needs to be a cultural denazification to demolish the Classics attacks on the sound mythological scholarship of the nineteenth century such as Massey and this Jewish Encyclopedia source.

As you have pointed out, Josephus and Philo both say the breastplate of the Jewish high priest was based on the twelve signs of the zodiac. So astrolatry was at the centre of Jewish faith. Its expulsion was part of the imperial agenda of idiot monotheism.

David Ulansey discusses astral themes in the curtain of the temple, the one that was supposedly rent from top to bottom.

David Ulansey wrote:
http://www.well.com/~davidu/veil.html
THE HEAVENLY VEIL TORN: MARK'S COSMIC "INCLUSIO" - David Ulansey
[Originally published in Journal of Biblical Literature 110:1 (Spring 1991) pp. 123-25]

"spectacular confirmation of the existence in Mark's imagination of a link between the tearing of the heavens and the tearing of the temple veil. The evidence to which I refer consists of a passage in Josephus's Jewish War in which he describes the outer veil of the Jerusalem temple as it had appeared since the time of Herod. According to Josephus, this outer veil was a gigantic curtain 80 feet high. It was, he says, a "Babylonian tapestry, with embroidery of blue and fine linen, of scarlet also and purple, wrought with marvelous skill. Nor was this mixture of materials without its mystic meaning: it typified the universe...." Then Josephus tells us what was pictured on this curtain: "Portrayed on this tapestry was a panorama of the entire heavens...." In other words, the outer veil of the Jerusalem temple was actually one huge image of the starry sky! Thus, upon encountering Mark's statement that "the veil of the temple was torn in two from top to bottom," any of his readers who had ever seen the temple or heard it described would instantly have seen in their mind's eye an image of the heavens being torn, and would immediately have been reminded of Mark's earlier description of the heavens being torn at the baptism. This can hardly be coincidence: the symbolic parallel is so striking that Mark must have consciously intended it.


Quote:
Here's an image of Jews worshipping the Semitic god Molech, who was largely solar and stellar:
http://freethoughtnation.com/jewsworshippingmolech.jpg The natural end result of Israelite astrolatry:


The picture of Moloch shows child sacrifice. Black Athena explains how Flaubert's book Salambbo was the most influential work in establishing Moloch as a picture of evil. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moloch#Fla ... conception


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Dec 01, 2011 12:01 pm 
Offline
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Sat Mar 28, 2009 8:41 pm
Posts: 844
Here is a talk I just gave on Astrology From Ancient Egypt

http://rtulip.net/yahoo_site_admin/asse ... 62628.docx


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Dec 02, 2011 2:43 am 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Sun Aug 06, 2006 4:09 pm
Posts: 2142
Robert, that's a mindblower!

There's so much there, I now know what it's like to read something I've written. :D

I can't vouch for every fact among thousands you've provided, but from what I've seen, job well done indeed!

Please do enlighten us as to where you gave that talk.

Robert Tulip wrote:
Here is a talk I just gave on Astrology From Ancient Egypt

http://rtulip.net/yahoo_site_admin/asse ... 64900.docx

_________________
Why suffer from Egyptoparallelophobia, when you can read Christ in Egypt? Try it - you'll like it:

Image


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 121 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5 ... 9  Next

All times are UTC - 5 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Truth Be Known | Stellar House Publishing
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group
Live Support