Ancient Hebrew text reveals Ark of the Covenant’s fate?

Here we go again! Firstly, it should be noted that such divine arks were COMMON in antiquity, among OTHER cultures as well, such as the Egyptian. I discuss the magical ark myth in Did Moses Exist? Secondly, note the astrotheological imagery here, from this recently translated text:

“The treatise describes the treasures in an imaginative way. One part refers to ‘seventy-seven tables of gold, and their gold was from the walls of the Garden of Eden that was revealed to Solomon, and they radiated like the radiance of the sun and moon, which radiate at the height of the world.'”

The above is not a description of a wondrous real place, whether on earth or an alien planet. It’s a MYTHICAL motif.

Indiana Jones and the Ark of the Covenant

Fate of Ark of the Covenant Revealed in Hebrew Text

A newly translated Hebrew text claims to reveal where treasures from King Solomon’s temple were hidden and discusses the fate of the Ark of the Covenant itself.

 

But unlike the Indiana Jones movie “Raiders of the Lost Ark,” the text leaves the exact location of the Ark unclear and states that it, and the other treasures, “shall not be revealed until the day of the coming of the Messiah son of David …” putting it out of reach of any would-be treasure seeker.

 

King Solomon’s Temple, also called the First Temple, was plundered and torched by the Babylonian King Nebuchadnezzar II in the sixth century B.C., according to the Hebrew Bible. The Ark of the Covenant is a chest that, when originally built, was said to have held tablets containing the 10 commandments. It was housed in Solomon’s Temple, a place that contained many different treasures. [Religious Mysteries: 8 Alleged Relics of Jesus]

 

The newly translated text, called “Treatise of the Vessels” (Massekhet Kelim in Hebrew), says the “treasures were concealed by a number of Levites and prophets,” writes James Davila, a professor at the University of St. Andrews, in an article in the book “Old Testament Pseudepigrapha More Noncanonical Scriptures Volume 1” (William B. Eerdmans Publishing Co., 2013).

 

“Some of these (treasures) were hidden in various locations in the Land of Israel and in Babylonia, while others were delivered into the hands of the angels Shamshiel, Michael, Gabriel and perhaps Sariel …” writes Davila in his article.

 

The treatise is similar in some ways to the metallic “Copper Scroll,” one of the Dead Sea Scrolls found near the site of Qumran in the West Bank. The Copper Scroll also discusses the location of hidden treasure, although not from Solomon’s Temple.

 

The treatise describes the treasures in an imaginative way. One part refers to “seventy-seven tables of gold, and their gold was from the walls of the Garden of Eden that was revealed to Solomon, and they radiated like the radiance of the sun and moon, which radiate at the height of the world.”

 

The oldest confirmed example of the treatise, which survives to present day, is from a book published in Amsterdam in 1648 called “Emek Halachah.” In 1876, a scholar named Adolph Jellinek published another copy of the text, which was virtually identical to the 1648 version. Davila is the first to translate the text fully into English….

 

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  1. Pennsylvania Non-Believer

    There have always been legends of hidden treasures and cryptic maps or directions as to where to find them. The story of the Arc of the Covenant evolved from many similar prior tales. The added layer of the treasure hunt to find is just ongoing tale weaving.

  2. This ark story reminds me of other stories Joseph Campbell wrote or talked about wherein the “treasure” is buried inside an egg, little box or bottle or something similar at the bottom of an ocean or on top of a mountain or in a deep cave or in a hollow tree in a deep, dark forest, etc.

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